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Mirtazapine
Brand Name(s):
Remeron
Drug Class:
Antidepressant
Available OTC?: No
Available Generic?: No

Remeron 15 mg
(Organon)
Available In
Why Prescribed
How It Works
Range and Frequency
Onset of Effect
Duration of Action
Dietary Advice
Storage
Missed Dose
Stopping the Drug
Prolonged Use
Over 60
Driving and Hazardous Work
Alcohol
Pregnancy
Breast Feeding
Infants and Children
Special Concerns
Overdose Symptoms
What to Do
Drug Interactions
Food Interactions
Disease Interactions
 


Available In
Tablets

Why Prescribed
To treat symptoms of major depression.

How It Works
While the exact mechanism of action of mirtazapine is not known, it affects levels of brain chemicals (norepinephrine and Serotonin) that are thought to be linked to mood, emotions, and mental state.

Range and Frequency
To start, 15 mg once a day, at bedtime. The dose may be increased gradually by your doctor to no more than 45 mg a day.

Onset of Effect
Unknown.

Duration of Action
Unknown.

Dietary Advice
No special restrictions.

Storage
Store in a tightly sealed container away from heat, moisture, and direct light.

Missed Dose
Take it as soon as you remember. However, if it is near the time for the next day's dose, skip the missed dose and resume your regular dosage schedule. Do not double the next day's dose.

Stopping the Drug
Take as prescribed for the full treatment period, even if you begin to feel better before the scheduled end of therapy. The decision to stop taking the drug should be made in consultation with your doctor.

Prolonged Use
You should see your doctor regularly for tests and examinations if you take this medicine for a prolonged period. Prolonged use of mirtazapine can decrease the flow of saliva, which can increase the risk of cavities, periodontal disease, and other conditions.

Over 60
No special problems have been reported.

Driving and Hazardous Work
Exercise caution until you determine how the medicine affects you. Drowsiness or lightheadedness can occur.

Alcohol
Avoid alcohol.

Pregnancy
In animal studies, mirtazapine did not cause birth defects but was shown to cause other problems. Human studies have not been done. Before you take mirtazapine, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

Breast Feeding
Mirtazapine may pass into breast milk; caution is advised. Consult your doctor for advice.

Infants and Children
The safety and effectiveness of mirtazapine use by infants and children have not been established.

Special Concerns
If dry mouth occurs, use sugarless candy or gum for relief.

Overdose Symptoms
Severe drowsiness, disorientation, loss of memory, rapid heartbeat.

What to Do
Call your doctor, emergency medical services (EMS), or the nearest poison control center immediately.

Drug Interactions
Mirtazapine and MAO inhibitors should not be used within 14 days of each other. Very serious side effects such as myoclonus (uncontrolled muscle jerking), hyperthermia (excessive rise in body temperature), nausea, vomiting, seizures, and extreme stiffness may result. Other drugs may interact with mirtazapine; consult your doctor for specific advice if you are taking central nervous system depressants, high blood pressure medication, diazepam, or kidney medication.

Food Interactions
No known food interactions.

Disease Interactions
Caution is advised when taking mirtazapine. Consult your doctor if you have heart or blood vessel disease; or a history of seizures, drug abuse, or mental illness. Use of mirtazapine may cause complications in patients with liver or kidney disease, since these organs work together to remove the medication from the body.


Drug/Nutrient Interactions
View Drug Interactions

Date Published: 4/14/2005
Date Reviewed: 4/14/2005


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Serious

Mood or mental changes, confusion, breathing difficulties, increased or decreased ability to move limbs, flu-like symptoms, swelling of the lower extremities, skin rash, anxiety, agitation, extreme drowsiness, disorientation, loss of memory, rapid heartbeat. Call your doctor immediately.
Common

Dizziness, dry mouth, drowsiness, constipation, increased appetite, weight gain.
Less Common

Muscle pains, unusual dreams, fatigue, back pain, vomiting, increased thirst, nausea, dizziness or fainting when getting up suddenly, sensitivity to touch, tremor, stomach pain, increased urination.
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